The first clinical trial with automatic blood collection and testing instruments, In the future, robots will be able to take blood samples, which will benefit patients and health professionals.

The team led by Rutgers has developed a blood collection robot that performs better or better than humans, according to the first clinical study in humans using automatic blood collection and testing devices.

This device provides fast results and allows health professionals to spend more time caring for patients in hospitals and other settings. The first clinical trial with automatic blood collection and testing instruments.

The results were comparable or higher than clinical standards with an overall success rate of 87% for 31 blood donors.

For 25 people whose veins are easily accessible, the success rate is 97%.

This device contains an ultrasound-guided robot that draws blood from veins.

A fully integrated device that includes a sample preparation module and centrifuge-based blood analyzer can be used on bedside tables and ambulances, emergency rooms, clinics, medical practices, and hospitals.

Venipuncture, where a needle is inserted into a vein to take blood samples or conduct IV therapy, is the most common clinical procedure in the whole world. More than 1.4 billion operations are carried out in the United States every day.

According to previous studies, 27% of patients without visible veins, 40% of patients without palpable palms and 60% of tired patients failed. The first clinical trial with automatic blood collection and testing instruments.

Repeated failure at the beginning of the IV line increases the likelihood of phlebitis, thrombosis and infection, and may require placement of large veins in the body or arteries at a much higher cost and risk. As a result, venipuncture is a major cause of injury to patients and doctors.

In addition, difficult vein access can add up to one hour to treatment time, requires more staff, and is estimated to cost more than $ 4 billion per year in the United States.

“Devices like us can help doctors take blood samples quickly, safely, and reliably to avoid unnecessary complications and pain in patients who repeatedly try to insert needles,” the researchers said.

In the future, this device can be used for procedures such as IV catheterization, central venous access, dialysis and arterial line placement. The next step involves refining the device to increase success in patients with veins that are difficult to access. The first clinical trial with automatic blood collection and testing instruments.

Data from this study are used to improve artificial intelligence in robots and to improve performance.

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