Bumblebees can survive an object with one sense and later with another, This is because our brain can store information so that it can be extracted from different senses.

This multi-sensory integration allows us to shape the mental image of the world and support our consciousness.

It turns out that the ability to recognize objects with different senses is present in the insect’s cerebellum. In light, but without touching objects, bees are trained to find beneficial sugar water in one type of object (cube or ball) and bitter quinine solutions in other species. Bumblebees can survive an object with one sense and later with another.

When testing in the dark, bees prefer items that were previously valued and spend more time studying. Bees also decide the opposite. After learning to find shapes in the dark, bees are tested in light and again prefer that the shapes they learn are only valued by touch.

This ability is called cross-recognition and allows us to understand the overall picture of the world with rich imagination.

Our results show that bees do not process their senses as separate channels, but are collected as a kind of integrated representation.

Researchers say: We have long known that bees can remember the shape of flowers. For example, a smartphone can recognize your face and this is without perception. Bumblebees can survive an object with one sense and later with another.

Our new work shows that something in the mind of a bee is completely different from the machine that the bee uses to make mental images of shapes.

This is an extraordinary achievement considering the small size of the bee’s brain. Future research on the nerve chains that underlie the ability of bees will one day help us find out how our brains imagine the world when we do it.