New study explains how the galaxies are forming spiral shapes, Our Milky Way Galaxy has an elegant spiral shape with long arms full of stars, but scientists have long confused about how long this shape lasts.

New observations from other galaxies explain how spiral galaxies like us assume the shape of their symbols.

Magnetic fields play an important role in the design of these galaxies, according to research by the Stratospheric Observatory for Infrared Astronomy (SOFIA).

Scientists have measured magnetic fields along with galactic spiral galaxies called NGC 1068 or M77. The field represented as a flow that follows the circular arms.

Magnetic fields are invisible, but they can influence the evolution of galaxies, the researchers said.

We have a good understanding of how gravity affects the structure of galaxies, but only now do we study the role of magnetic fields.

The M77 galaxy is 47 million light-years away in the constellation Cetus. In the center is an active black hole that is twice as big as the black hole in the heart of our Milky Way galaxy.

Rotating arms filled with dust, gas, and strong star-forming areas called star explosions.

SOFIA’s infrared observations show what the human eye cannot do: a magnetic field that follows the baby’s spiral arms. This supports the leading theory of how to force these weapons into the form of their symbol known as the Shaft Density Theory.

It said that dust, gas, and stars do not cling to hands like fan blades. Instead, the material moves along the shoulder while gravity presses it like objects in a conveyor belt.

The orientation of the magnetic field extends along a large shoulder – around 24,000 light-years. This means that the gravitational force that creates the spiral shape of the galaxy also compresses its magnetic field, which supports the theory of shaft density.

This is the first time we have seen a large-scale magnetic field that coincides with the birth of stars today in spiral arms, researchers say. It is always interesting to have evidence to support the theory.

This means that the gravitational force that creates the spiral shape of the galaxy also compresses its magnetic field, which supports the theory of shaft density.

This is the first time we see a magnetic field parallel to a large scale with the birth of a star currently in a spiral arm.

More observations needed to understand how magnetic fields affect the formation and evolution of other types of galaxies, such as irregular galaxies.